Diabetes and Technology

FreeAPSX: The new entry to the DIYAPS world | Diabettech


If you observe social media in relation to DIYAPS, you’ll have noticed over the past week or so that there’s been some excitement brewing. And that’s thanks to Ivan Valkou’s release of the beta code for FreeAPSX.

 

“FreeAPSX? What’s that then?” I hear you saying. I’ve heard of FreeAPS, but isn’t that just another version of Loop?

Well, no. Let’s unpack what the state of the DIYAPS world is right now, and hopefully all will become clear.

DIYAPS System Types

For a long while now (since 2016) there have been two parallel streams of DIYAPS system. The Loop stream and the OpenAPS/oref1 stream. Each has a different algorithm, with a number of experiments suggesting that oref1 is the more advanced algorithm.

Loop comes in the handy package of being capable of running on an iPhone, which for many, is the killer function.

  • It was also the first to allow use of the OmniPod and was picked up by Tidepool to be put forward to the FDA.
  • The original FreeAPS is a Loop workspace, introducing a number of functionalities that aren’t in the original version of Loop, including highly customisable microboluses and a non-linear carb absorption model. It also includes support for non-Dexcom CGM systems within the app.

oref1, as instantiated in OpenAPS, runs on a small computer, such as a Raspberry Pi or an Intel Edison.

In AndroidAPS, it runs on an Android phone, and comes with some of the oref1 features disabled. These include Exercise mode, adjusting sensitivity with temp targets and Autotune.

It also has a series of additional features that don’t exist in OpenAPS. Examples are automated Open Humans upload, profile switching and automation (where you can trigger actions based on events).

Until very recently, there was no implementation of oref1 on the iPhone.

Introducing FreeAPSX

And that’s where FreeAPSX comes in. It is an implementation of all that is in oref1 for iOS. It looks like the below, a sort of hybrid of Loop and AndroidAPS, and it’s very much at a Beta stage.

 

FreeAPSX: The new entry to the DIYAPS world

And what does FreeAPSX contain?

Here’s your list:

  • It uses modified rileylink_ios library, thus supporting the same pump list as Loop (i.e. Old medtronic pumps and OmniPod Eros via some form of RileyLink hardware);
  • All base functions of oref0
  • All base functions of oref1 (SMB, UAM and others)
  • Autotune
  • Autosens
  • Nightscout BG data source as a CGM (Online)
  • Applications that mimic Nightscout as a CGM (apps like Spike and Diabox) (Offline)
  • System state upload to Nightscout
  • Remote carbs enter and temporary targets through Nightscout

It’s a system in active development at the moment. As I mentioned, it is a Beta release, so anyone using it does so understanding fully that it is being tested.

Given it’s actively being developed, what does that mean about what is not there yet, and is planned for the future?

  • Phone notifications of the system state
  • Bolus cancelation possibility
  • Profile upload to Nightscout
  • Desktop widget
  • Apple Watch app
  • Remote bolusing and insulin pump control
  • Plugins
  • Dexcom support
  • Apple Health support
  • Detailed functions description inside the app

Helpful links to understand the features

If you’re looking at this as a Loop user and wondering what all the acronyms mean, here are some links to help explain what the various components are and do:

And here it is in all its glory, running on my old iPhone X, with an OrangeLink and Medtronic 722. As you can see, it’s running in a test configuration, without being attached to me. So far it looks stable and seems to work very well.

May be an image of phone and screen

If you’re an iPhone user and you feel that you need something different, then here’s something that will shortly provide that to you.


If you’re interested in taking a look at the beta version, the code can be found here.

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